December 6, 2022

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Coco+Oak has a monthly pop-up shop at the Grafton Flea Market and is planning a brick-and-mortar site in downtown Alton next spring. The business will host a “Winter Wonderland” fashion show 6-8 p.m. Dec. 7 at The Lovejoy in Alton featuring Alton High School athletes.
Eades
ALTON — Get a sneak peek at who’s moving to downtown Alton this spring with Coco+Oak’s Winter Wonderland Fashion Show and Shopping event.
Coco+Oak clothing boutique’s Winter Wonderland event is planned 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7, at The Lovejoy, 401 Piasa St., in Alton. 
Coco+Oak owner Madeline Eades also is president of the Alton Athletic Association. About a dozen Alton High School athletes will be walking the show’s runway. Eades’ daughter, Scarlett Eades, is a sophomore at AHS and a three-sport athlete in tennis, soccer and basketball. 
“I thought it would be fun to include the athletes,” Eades said. “And what better models to have than our local athletes?”
Proceeds from the fashion show and a portion of the shopping event profit will go to the Alton Crisis Food Center.  
Winter Wonderland tickets cost $25 per person.  There will be a cash bar and food available for purchase. 
Currently Coco+Oak is online at www.cocoandoak.com or its Facebook page. Eades plans to set up a Coco+Oak brick-and-mortar store in the Three Charming Chicks building at 219 William St. by spring, Eades said Three Charming Chicks is moving next door, she said. 
Eades, of Dorsey, is a good friend of The Lovejoy owner Russ Smith. She said she was encouraged by Smith to open a brick-and-mortar boutique in downtown Alton. 
“He said I should be downtown,” she recalled. “I love Alton and the historical buildings. Then he was gracious enough to give me the space to have this fashion show.
“I thought it would be a good way to showcase Coco+Oak coming into downtown, to show what I have, and also raise money and make a donation to Alton Crisis Food Center.” 
Coco+Oak carries juniors to women’s fashion, and occasionally men or children’s items.
“When I open the brick-and-mortar, I hope to have variety of items,” Eades said. 
Prior to the pandemic, Eades worked for Ashley Furniture in sales and marketing. Once COVID-19 came, she started her own business three years ago with Coco+Oak. 
“I took $1,000 and bought a rack of clothes to see what would happen,” she recalled. “It’s been growing, and I’m seeing lot of growth. I do the Grafton Flea Market and pop-up shops, so that nudged me into opening a brick-and-mortar store.”
Visit www.cocoandoak.com for more information. 
 
Jill Moon is an award-winning journalist and features editor for Hearst Newspapers. She also is editor-in-chief of Hearst’s award-winning On the Edge of the Weekend monthly culture and entertainment magazine.

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